Planning for Summer: Building the Best Patio in the Neighborhood

Whether you’re dreaming up a brand new outdoor living space or you’re dying to revamp an unsightly slab of concrete, planning ahead is key to creating a patio that’s both beautiful and functional. Here’s the approach suggested by our pros:

Consider the purpose of your patio.

First things first you have some questions to ask yourself: “Am I going to throw a lot of parties outside, use it as a family space, or do I want a small, quiet, private patio just big enough for a couple of chairs and a bistro table?” These initial questions are crucial; you must decide whether your patio will be a gathering place or a getaway space.outdoor-living-space4

Consider that old real estate mantra: location, location, location.

Most patios should be accessible to the kitchen, since that’s where people generally come outside, and down as few steps as possible. However, a getaway patio — perhaps a new space in addition to an entertaining patio — can be more remote, toward the back of the property.
Walk around the property with your Patterson superintendant and check out vantage points to determine location and orientation. Depending on what kind of landscaping the house already has, how close it is to neighboring homes, and whether there’s a view, we can usually come up with a couple of areas that will work. Finding the best spot is key early on. Once you know the feel you’re looking for and where you want to put it we’ll be able to start sketching!

Like location, size matters.

It’s common to underestimate how big the patio should be. How many people will normally congregate in the space? Most pros thing building a patio with a central fire pit and 4 or 5 chairs, it might be a circle of 14 feet in diameter or larger.
There’s no specific rule of thumb as to size, but if the site allows, design proportionately to the house, making the patio as wide as the house and as long as the house’s height, or matching it to the size of an indoor room.

Think about shape, which may be partially determined by the site.

There are three basic design styles commonly used in patio remodels: symmetrical to the house, assymetrical (slightly askew to the house, but still geometric and modern-looking) and voluptuous curves, which flow with nature. Curved lines are trendy. Non-geometric patios are said to provide visual interest even when you’re not on the patio. This idea is important because people don’t just sit on the patio; they see it from inside the house and out in the yard as well

Choose building materials to complement the color and style of your house.

Black-stained concrete mIMG_2300-1030x773ay not look good against a stately Cape Cod. Gray pavers may look out of place next to a stucco home.
Natural materials like local stone are popular but expensive. Concrete pavers provide a lower-cost option, and they come in a wide range of colors, textures and shapes. If you use pavers, break up the space with plenty of plants and furniture, as pavers tend to absorb light rather than reflect it, and they can look industrial in a wide-open expanse.
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Plan the landscaping.

Before putting down roots, be honest about whether you’re a plant lover or a low-maintenance person. In our opinion, you can always do the hardscape first and add plant material later, when it’s easier to visualize the space as a whole. Remember, the surrounding space and all of its colors and textures tie your patio together!
We love to plant right in the patio by leaving a space of ground surrounded by stone or pavers, or jackhammering out a chunk of concrete. Break the patio up with greenery. Can’t do that? We recommend adding potted plants; pick pots that fit your color scheme as well as pops of bright colors like blue, yellow, or orange to make the space more inviting.
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Finally, think about the extras.
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A fireplace or fire pit provides evening appeal; a water feature adds ambiance and helps block noise from a busy street. Landscape lighting around the patio is lovely after the sun goes down, and a well-placed trellis can shade the hot afternoon sun and give privacy from a neighbor’s second story.
As you plan, make it fun! Play around a little, and don’t get hung up on details too early. The patio is a part of your home, so have fun with the design and make

Kitchen Counter Tops: What’s Trending for 2017?

Patterson Remodeling can ensure all your needs are met when you’re building your dream kitchen, a HUGE aspect of which being your counter tops. Choosing the right kitchen counter top can be tricky (and expensive!). Before splurging on such a big update, check out the pros and cons of the top kitchen countertop materials to help you select the right one for your space.

Quartz Countertops

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Practically maintenance free, engineered quartz countertops are stain, acid, scratch, heat and impact resistant and, thanks to their non-porous surface, don’t need to be sealed like natural stone countertops. Available in a wide range of colors and patterns, quartz typically ranks close in popularity to the perennial top choice: granite.

 

 

Polished Granite CountertopsIMG_0886-1030x773

Still the top choice of most homeowners, traditional granite countertops offer a high-end look that adds to your kitchen’s value while providing a durable prep surface. Because granite is a natural material, variation in the stone’s pattern is common and, for most people, adds to its appeal but can make matching up slabs tricky. In most regions, the cost of granite and quartz are comparable but natural granite requires a bit more care than manufactured quartz to keep its good looks — wipe up all stains quickly, especially oils, wine, acids and soda, and follow a regular sealing routine — typically once a year.

Laminate Countertops

Original-brian-patrick-flynn-grey-kitchen-countertop_s4x3.jpg.rend.hgtvcom.966.725By far the most budget-friendly option, laminate countertops are enjoying a resurgence in popularity thanks to new patterns that resemble natural stone, wood or even quartz at a fraction of the cost. Retro, mid-century looks like the ubiquitous boomerang and bright, saturated colors are other trendy choices to consider.

 

 

Wood Countertops

For a warm, cottage kitchen look, opt for butcher-block-style wood countertops. Both decorative and

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functional, this hard working surface is ideal for food prep — properly sealed, wood countertops are sanitary even for chopping meat. Unlike other budget-friendly options, like laminate, wood is highly heat-resistant so you don’t have to worry about putting hot pots and pans on the surface. Most homeowners choose to mix wood countertops with other surfaces like natural or engineered stone to provide a variety of prep surfaces.

Marble Countertops

The current darling of the design world, the gray-toned veining in Carrara or Calacatta marble isn’t just aesthetically pleasing, it also helps to disguise wear and hide light stains. With timeless appeal, this stoneoriginal_Joel-Snayd-Rethink-Design-kitchen-marble-walls_s4x3.jpg.rend.hgtvcom.966.725 gives any kitchen a decidedly high-end look and, although the cost is comparable to some granites, marble is porous so staining can be a problem. Regular sealing and special care with anything acidic to prevent etching will keep the creamy surface looking its best.

 

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Tile CountertopsIMG_0773-1030x773

Tile countertops are a great choice if you want an inexpensive material that’s easy to maintain.With endless colors, styles, and patterns available, it’s easy to pick something that fits your home’s style- and for the price, add a nice backspash to go with! It’s simple to coordinate with or mix and match with different design styles.

waterproof, leak, flood, rain, patterson, remodeling, mesa, arizona

Is Your Home Safe From the Rain? 5 Simp Steps to Waterproof Your Home

1) Rain Gutter Repairs

Nobody likes to clean or repair gutters. However, there are a few ways to make the job easier. First, for clogged downspouts, try using barbecue tongs to reach in and pull the leaves out. This doesn’t always work but considering the alternative — using a hose to flush the clog out, getting wet and covered with gutter goop — it’s worth a try.

Second, to repair loose gutter nails try replacing them with extra-long lag screws. The lag screws tend to be stronger, hold better and can easily be installed with a cordless drill equipped with a nut driver bit.

2) Repair Cracks in Concrete

Concrete always cracks, but that doesn’t mean you have to live with it that way. For most cracks less than 1/4″, applying concrete caulk is a good way to make repairs. Just clean the crack out with a high-pressure hose nozzle, let it dry and then apply the caulk into the crack.

For larger cracks, substitute concrete patch for caulk. Large cracks or small, repair is necessary because water that finds its way into cracks will soften the ground underneath and cause more cracking. The situation worsens if the water freezes. For larger cracks, substitute concrete patch for caulk. Large cracks or small, repair is necessary because water that finds its way into cracks will soften the ground underneath and cause more cracking. The situation worsens if the water freezes.

3) Sticky Windows and Doors

With all the wet weather that spring brings, wooden windows and doors can’t help but swell and stick. To repair a sticky door or window, first mark where it is sticking. Next, remove the door or window by taking out its hinge pins, prop it up securely and with a hand plane, carefully remove any excess material. Power planes will work, too, but there is a tendency to remove too much. When the wood shrinks back during the drier, warmer days of summer, the gap will be too wide.

For sliding windows, often the trim around them is the culprit and must be removed and reinstalled to allow for more movement. To do this, carefully remove the trim with a flat bar and pull the nails out backwards that is, grasp the nail point with pliers and pull. If the trim was installed properly with finishing nails, you should be able to do this without damaging the wood. When reinstalling, keep the fit snug but not as tight as it was. If you reinstall the trim too loosely, the windows will rattle when the wood shrinks again.

To keep windows and doors from sticking in the first place, make sure that they are sealed with a good coat of paint, including the tops and bottoms. But dont paint the channels where windows need to slide. Instead, use a light coat of linseed oil as a sealer.

4) Paint Over Water Damage

The problem with water stains is that painting over them will not make them go away unless you use a primer-sealer first. When looking for a sealer, follow these basic guidelines: First, oil-based sealers usually work better than water-based. Second, choose a sealer that has a high amount of solids. Solids consist of pigments and other elements that do the actual covering of the stain. Paint, hardware and home centers carry primer-sealers (sometimes called sealer-primers) such as Kilz and Zinsser.

One other tip when using an oil-based sealer, consider using disposable brushes and rollers. Cleaning up after using oil-based products can be messy and often requires that you spend more on paint thinner than your brushes and rollers are worth.

5) Paint and Repair Rusty Fixtures

It used to be that the only way to do a good paint job over rust was to get out the naval jelly or wire brush and remove the rust first. Thankfully, paint additives are now available to help paint stick to rust while also neutralizing the rust and stopping corrosion from continuing under the paint.

If left untreated, rust will eventually cause your fixtures to lock up. Prevent this by keeping fixtures well lubricated. One of the most common mistakes people make is trying to lubricate outdoor fixtures with light oil or silicon from spray cans. Because these oils are so light, they often evaporate and/or dilute existing lubrication thereby making the problem worse. For fixtures like gate hinges and latches, use heavy grease. It will not evaporate and its heavy viscosity is the best thing for heavy-duty parts. Most auto parts stores have heavy grease.